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Newsletter Features

Below are featured articles from the Indian Energy Beat newsletter. Download full issues of the newsletter

October 20, 2014
Leading the Charge: Chairman Vig Champions Progress, Sustainability

A photo of Chairman Vig.Change doesn’t happen on its own. It’s led by dedicated and passionate people who are committed to empowering Indian Country to energize future generations. Leading the Charge is a regular feature spotlighting the movers and shakers in energy on tribal lands.

October 20, 2014
PV panels installed on Grand Ronde Tribal Housing Authority carport. Photo from GRTHA, NREL 31797
Winning the Future: Grand Ronde Solar Projects Reduce Pollution, Cut Costs

Challenge: Situated on nearly 12,000 acres in the heart of Western Oregon’s scenic coastal range, the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde Community of Oregon has a strong connection to the earth and nature and a deep commitment to environmental stewardship. Landless from 1954 until 1983 when the Grand Ronde Restoration Act returned a portion of its land base, the Tribe has faced an uphill climb building out the infrastructure and services required to support and sustain its community of approximately 5,000 members.

October 20, 2014
With DOE support, workers weatherize the exterior of the Lakeview Lodge in Minto, Alaska. Photo from Russell Snyder, Interior Regional Housing Authority, NREL 31796
Minto Upgrades Community Lodge with START Support

The Lakeview Lodge is the heart of Minto, a small Alaska Native village 126 miles northwest of Fairbanks. The 12,000-square-foot building is used daily for school and senior lunch programs, community meetings, and village council operations.

“It is critical to the community,” said Bessie Titus, Administrator for the Minto Village Council, which represents 210 residents.

March 13, 2014
The San Carlos Apache Tribe is making use of its extensive solar resources to power tribal facilities, including this 10-kilowatt (kW) solar PV system, which generates energy to run the tribal radio tower. Photo from San Carlos Apache Tribe, NREL 29202
San Carlos Apache Tribe Set to Break Ground on New Solar Project

This spring, the San Carlos Apache Tribe plans to break ground on a new tribally financed and owned 1.1-megawatt solar photovoltaic (PV) array that will power tribal enterprises, reduce energy use, and curb greenhouse gas emissions.

March 13, 2014
CWG community members review structural plans as part of their wind turbine training in Kwigillingok, AK. Photo from Intelligent Energy Systems, NREL 29205
Winning the Future: Chaninik Wind Group Pursues Innovative Solutions to Native Alaska Energy Challenges

Between 2010 and 2013, Chaninik Wind Group (CWG) implemented a multi-village wind heat smart grid in the Alaska Native villages of Kongiganak, Kwigillingok, and Tuntutuliak, integrating heating systems and a grid installed with partial funding through the DOE Tribal Energy Program with the five existing 95-kW wind turbines CWG had installed in each community. Each system produces wind capacity in excess of 200% of the peak load and uses an on-site wind-diesel smart grid control system to maximize efficiency.

March 13, 2014
Chairwoman Karen Diver, Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa (MN)
Leading the Charge: Native Leaders Give Tribes a Voice on White House Climate Task Force

As members of the State, Local, and Tribal Leaders Task Force on Climate Preparedness and Resilience, Chairwoman Karen Diver, Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa (MN), and Mayor Reggie Joule, Northwest Arctic Borough (AK), are tasked with providing President Obama with recommendations on measures that will help tribal communities better prepare for and deal with the effects of climate change.

September 6, 2013
The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians are converting waste vegetable oil and grease to biofuel in an effort to reduce the environmental impact of their energy use.
Fuel from Waste Helps Power Two Tribes

The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians had plenty of used vegetable oil and grease on hand and a desire to convert the waste to biofuel to reduce the environmental impact of their energy use. The Tribes participated in a demonstration project with the intent to share their experience and lessons learned so that other Tribes would be able to replicate the results on their own lands.

March 1, 2013
In addition to the planned 250-MW solar farm set to begin construction in June 2013, the Moapa Band of Paiutes is working on a second 150-MW project that would use both PV and concentrated solar technologies to generate power for the Tribe. Photo from Moapa Band of Paiutes.
Bright Skies Ahead for Moapa

The Moapa Band of Paiutes leads the first industrial-scale solar photovoltaic project in Indian Country—a 250-megawatt solar farm that will power nearly 120,000 homes in Los Angeles.

October 22, 2012
Andrea Alexander, Makah Tribe in Neah Bay (Washington)/Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians
Leading the Charge: Tribal Women in Power

Change doesn’t happen on its own. It’s led by dedicated and passionate people who are committed to empowering Indian Country to energize future generations. Leading the Charge is a regular Office of Indian Energy Newsletter feature spotlighting the movers and shakers in energy development on tribal lands. For this issue, we spoke with three key energy supporters whose efforts in championing Indian energy development are amplified because of their intertribal affiliations.

October 22, 2012
Pictured from left to right on Agua Caliente tribal land: Colleen Cooley, Student Intern Program Supervisor Sandra Begay-Campbell of Sandia National Laboratories, Chelsea Chee, Nikki Tulley, Nora Cata, and Jessica Rodriguez. Photo from Sandra Begay-Campbell, Sandia National Laboratories
Office of Indian Energy Sponsors Two Sandia Student Interns

Sandia National Laboratories’ Tribal Internship Program has provided Native American college students with hands-on work experience in the energy industry since 2002.

October 22, 2012
Newsletter Features
Crow Nation Students Participate in Algae Biomass Research Project

Student interns from the Crow Tribe in Montana participate in an algae biomass research project that could help prepare them for cleantech jobs and pave the way for their Tribe to produce clean, renewable energy.

June 22, 2012
Harold "Gus" Frank, Forest County Potawatomi Community Chairman and 2012 White House "Champion of Change". Photo from Potawatomi Traveling Times
Leading the Charge: Harold Frank

Change doesn’t happen on its own. It’s led by dedicated and passionate people who are committed to empowering Indian Country to energize future generations. Leading the Charge is a regular Office of Indian Energy newsletter feature spotlighting the movers and shakers in energy development on tribal lands. In this issue, we talk to Harold “Gus” Frank, Forest County Potawatomi Community Chairman and 2012 White House “Champion of Change.”

February 23, 2012
The Forest County Potawatomi Tribe's solar system is providing heating, cooling, and electricity to the Tribe's administration building in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Photo from the Forest County Potawatomi Tribe.
Forest County Potawatomi Tribe Cuts Emissions, Promotes Green Growth

In pursuit of its long-term energy goal of reducing its carbon footprint to zero, the Forest County Potawatomi Community has adopted an integrated renewable energy deployment plan that includes the installation of solar, biogas, and biomass energy systems to heat, cool, and power its tribal facilities.

February 23, 2012
Jim Manion, Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon
Leading the Charge: Jim Manion

Change doesn’t happen on its own. It’s led by dedicated and passionate people who are committed to empowering Indian Country to energize future generations. Leading the Charge is a regular Office of Indian Energy newsletter feature spotlighting the movers and shakers in energy development on tribal lands.