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Windows, Doors, & Skylights

Installing storm windows keep your home warm in the winter and cool in the summer while also lowering your energy bills by up to $350 a year. <a href="/node/797126" target="_blank">Start saving today by following a step-by-step guide in our new DIY Savings Project</a>.

Installing storm windows keep your home warm in the winter and cool in the summer while also lowering your energy bills by up to $350 a year. Start saving today by following a step-by-step guide in our new DIY Savings Project.

Energy-efficient windows, doors, and skylights—also known as fenestration—can help lower a home's heating, cooling, and lighting costs. Learn about the energy performance ratings to consider when selecting windows, doors, and skylights, and how to maximize their energy efficiency in your home.

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Energy-Efficient Windows
Energy-efficient windows provide space heating and lighting to this sunny kitchen. | Photo courtesy of Emily Minton-Redfield for Jim Logan Architects.

Windows affect home aesthetics as well as energy use.

Window Types
A wood-frame window with insulated window glazing. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/chandlerphoto

By combining an energy-efficient frame choice with glazing materials for your climate, you can customize your home's windows and reduce your energy bills.

Energy-Efficient Window Treatments
The awnings on this home shade the windows and generate electricity. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/jhorrocks

Choose window treatments that allow you to use natural light while reducing the heat gained in your house when the weather is warm and lost when it's cold.

Storm Windows
An energy upgrade on this daycare center included interior storm windows because most of the windows are on the north elevation. | Photo courtesy of Larry Kinney, Synergistic Building Technologies.

If your budget is tight, storm windows are less expensive than new, energy-efficient windows.

Doors
Although many people choose wood doors for their beauty, insulated steel and fiberglass doors are more energy-efficient. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/cstewart

Replacing or caulking and weatherstripping exterior doors can save money and energy in your home.

Skylights
A skylight can provide lighting, ventilation, views, and sometimes emergency egress. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/PaulaConnelly

When properly selected and installed, an energy-efficient skylight can help minimize your heating, cooling, and lighting costs.

5 Steps to Making Your Windows More Energy Efficient
Keep your hard-earned dollars from flying out the window by following the <a href="http://apps1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/publications/pdfs/building_america/measure_guide_wood_windows.pdf">latest guidelines for window repair, rehabilitation and replacement</a>. | Photo courtesy of the Weatherization Assistance Program Technical Assistance Center.

Whether you're a professional home performance contractor or a do-it-yourself homeowner, learn five simple steps for making your windows more energy efficient.