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Fact #911: February 8, 2016 Workplace Charging Increases VMT of Plug-in Vehicles in the EV Project

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The EV Project conducted by Idaho National Laboratory showed that plug-in vehicle owners with access to workplace charging (WPC) had higher vehicle miles of travel (VMT) than those without. The Chevrolet Volts and Nissan Leafs with WPC increased their all-electric VMT or eVMT by about 25%. The Chevrolet Volts without WPC averaged about 74% of their overall VMT on electricity. Those with WPC averaged an additional 2,336 miles on electricity and eVMT rose to 83% of their overall VMT. The bottom bar of the graph shows the national average annual VMT for vehicles during their first three years which is comparable to the vehicle ages in the study. With WPC, the overall VMT for the Chevrolet Volts in the study exceeded the national average annual VMT for vehicles in their first three years.

Average Annual Miles per Vehicle for Vehicles in the EV Project Compared to National Averages

Graphic showing average annual miles per vehicle for vehicles in the EV Project compared to the national averages.

Fact #911 Dataset

Supporting Information

Average Annual Miles per Vehicle for Vehicles in the EV Project Compared to National Averages
Vehicle Type and Charging Access Annual Miles per Vehicle
Using Only Electricity
Annual Miles per Vehicle
Using Electricity and/or Gasoline
Annual Miles per Vehicle
for All Light-Duty Vehicles
All Nissan Leafs 9,697    
Nissan Leafs with WPC access 11,882    
All Chevrolet Volts 9,112 12,238  
Chevrolet Volts with WPC access 11,448 13,759  
National Average of All Light-Duty Vehicles 11,346
National Average for a Vehicle's First Three Years 12,996

Sources: Leafs and Volts: Idaho National Laboratory, Plugged In: How Americans Charge Their Electric Vehicles, INL/EXT-15-35584, 2015.
National Average of All Light-Duty Vehicles: U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration, Highway Statistics 2013, Table VM-1, 2014.
National Average for a Vehicle's First Three Years: U.S. Department of Transportation, National Highway Safety Administration, Vehicle Survivability and Travel Mileage Schedules, DOT HS 809 952, January 2006.

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