About the Energy Materials Network

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Watch this introductory video to the Energy Materials Network (EMN) to learn more about this new model that aims to dramatically decrease the time-to-market for advanced materials innovations.

Watch this introductory video to the Energy Materials Network (EMN) to learn more about this new model that aims to dramatically decrease the time-to-market for advanced materials innovations.

Accelerating advanced materials development, from discovery through deployment, has the potential to revolutionize whole industries and is critical for the United States to compete globally in manufacturing in the 21st century. However, today only a small fraction of materials innovations make it to widespread commercialization. The goal of EMN is to dramatically decrease the time-to-market for advanced materials that are critical to manufacturing many clean energy technologies, enabling manufacturers of all sizes to develop and deliver innovative, made-in-America products to the world market.

Through targeted, national lab-led consortia, EMN will leverage more than $40 million in federal funding in 2016 to facilitate industry’s access to the unique scientific and technical resources at DOE’s national labs in high performance computing, synthesis and characterization of new materials, and high-impact experimentation. Each EMN consortium will bring together national labs, industry, and academia to focus on specific classes of materials aligned with industry’s most pressing challenges related to materials for clean energy technologies. Together, the EMN consortia will form a network of advanced materials R&D capabilities and resources that will support the Administration’s commitment to revitalizing American manufacturing and maintaining a competitive edge in the clean energy economy. 

The Lightweight Materials National Laboratory Consortium, or LightMat, is a network of nine national laboratories with technical capabilities highly relevant to lightweight materials development and utilization. LightMat provides straightforward access to resources and capabilities in this network via a single point of contact and works to match industry research teams with expertise and equipment found only at national laboratories. LightMat is led by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

The Electrocatalysis Consortium (ElectroCat) is dedicated to finding new ways to replace rare and costly platinum group metals used in hydrogen fuel cells with more abundant and less expensive substitutes. Finding an alternative to platinum will mean lower costs for U.S. manufacturers and consumers, addressing a key barrier to fuel cell deployment. ElectroCat is led by Argonne National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory. ElectroCat studies, creates, and implements possible alternatives to platinum-based electrodes through materials development efforts headed by Los Alamos and accelerated by the high-throughput, combinatorial, and characterization capabilities at Argonne.

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The Caloric Materials Consortium (CaloriCoolTM) focuses on the discovery of high-performance caloric solids and their most effective integration into the new generation of energy efficient solid-state refrigeration devices. Led by Ames Laboratory, CaloriCool addresses key foundational materials design and device integration challenges. In doing so, CaloriCool enables solid-state caloric cooling systems across a broad spectrum of applications ranging from residential and commercial air conditioning, refrigeration and freezing, to separation and liquefaction of gases.

 

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