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September 19, 2013
In this photo, two Argonne researchers are pictured with Argonne's first digital computer, AVIDAC. Designed and built by Argonne's Physics Division for $250,000, it began operations on January 28, 1953. AVIDAC stands for "Argonne Version of the Institute's Digital Automatic Computer" and was based on architecture developed by mathematician John von Neumann. Groundbreaking as it was, today's smartphones are far more sophisticated and powerful than this machine. | Photo courtesy of Argonne National Laboratory.
Photo of the Week: Throwback Thursday with AVIDAC

Check out our favorite energy-related photos!

September 19, 2013
A Clean Energy Revolution -- Now

Critics often say America's clean energy future will “always be five years away.” For four key clean energy technologies, that clean energy future has already arrived.

September 19, 2013
VIDEO: Watch the Solar Decathlon 2013 Google+ Hangout

Miss the Solar Decathlon 2013 Google+ Hangout? Watch a recording of it now.

September 19, 2013
This image shows the barred spiral galaxy NGC 1398. | Image courtesy of the Dark Energy Survey.
Supercomputing: A Toolbox to Simulate the Big Bang and Beyond

Learn how three Energy Department National Labs are collaborating to peer deeper into the origins of our universe than ever before.

September 19, 2013
Innovating to Meet the Evolving Cyber Challenge

Protecting the critical energy infrastructure that supports America's economy and security is vital -- and is a top Energy Department priority.

September 17, 2013
Solar Decathlon 2013: Going the Distance

As part of our behind-the-scenes look at what it takes to compete in the Solar Decathlon, we are examining how teams transport their houses to the competition site.

September 17, 2013
#CleanTechNow: America’s Clean Energy Revolution

A new Energy Department report shows how cost reductions and product improvements have sparked a surge in consumer demand for wind turbines, solar panels, electric vehicles and LED lighting.

September 16, 2013
It took six months and nearly 60 students to build Stanford’s Start.Home, a house that aims to lower the entry barrier for an ultra-efficient house and make sustainability trendy. | Photo courtesy of Stanford.
Solar Decathlon 2013: Building Skills for Future Careers

Part four in our behind-the-scenes look at competing in the Solar Decathlon, we are looking at how the teams bring their designs to life.

September 13, 2013
Our latest infographic -- Solar Decathlon 2013: The Path to a Brighter Future -- takes a look at the teams competing in this year’s competition and highlights innovative design features in each of the teams’ houses. Not featured in the "Meet the Teams" section, Team Texas will also compete at Solar Decathlon 2013 with their ADAPT house. | Infographic by <a href="/node/379579">Sarah Gerrity</a>, Energy Department.
Solar Decathlon 2013 Infographic: The Path to a Brighter Future

Our latest infographic takes a look at the teams competing in this year’s competition and highlights innovative design features in each of the teams’ houses.

September 13, 2013
Many of the materials that scientists work with at Brookhaven National Laboratory are too small and too precise for traditional tools. In cases like these, the labs grow materials instead of building them. Brookhaven physicist Genda Gu pioneered techniques that grow some of the largest single-crystal high-temperature superconductors in the world. The glowing chamber in this photo grows superconducting crystals. To do so, the furnace focuses infrared light onto a rod, melting it around 4,000 degrees Fahrenheit. Under just the right conditions, the liquefied material recrystallizes as a single uniform structure, which is highly sensitive and takes about one month to form. | Photo courtesy of Brookhaven National Laboratory.
Photo of the Week: How to Grow Superconducting Crystals

Check out our favorite energy-related photos!