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Nuclear Security & Nonproliferation

Highly trained nuclear emergency response personnel and more than 17,000 pounds of equipment were sent to Japan as part of the Department of Energy and National Nuclear Security Administration’s effort to assist Japanese personnel with nuclear issues related to the <a href="http://energy.gov/situation-japan-updated-051311">Fukushima nuclear power plant</a>. Above, scientists, technicians and engineers from the National Nuclear Security Administration’s Nevada Site Office board an Air Force C-17. | Photo courtesy of NNSA.

Highly trained nuclear emergency response personnel and more than 17,000 pounds of equipment were sent to Japan as part of the Department of Energy and National Nuclear Security Administration’s effort to assist Japanese personnel with nuclear issues related to the Fukushima nuclear power plant. Above, scientists, technicians and engineers from the National Nuclear Security Administration’s Nevada Site Office board an Air Force C-17. | Photo courtesy of NNSA.

As long as nuclear weapons exist, the United States will maintain a safe, secure and effective nuclear deterrent to keep America safe. In support of this presidential mandate, the Energy Department -- specifically the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) -- is responsible for ensuring the integrity and safety of the nation’s nuclear weapons, advancing nuclear nonproliferation and promoting international nuclear safety.

We also work with industry partners to model risks to privately owned U.S. nuclear facilities from cyber attacks and support climate change adaptation efforts to prevent overheating of nuclear reactors, an increasing threat as global temperatures rise and droughts become more common.

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NNSA Meets with Japanese Scientists to Discuss On-Going Fukushima Work
Scientists from the Japanese Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). | Photo from the Office of Public Affairs, NNSA

NNSA continues to collect data and prepare analyses concerning the state of readiness to respond to radiological emergencies.

Dismantling History: The Final W62 Warhead

Read about Secretary Chu and NNSA Administrator Tom D'Agostino's trip to Amarillo, Texas, where they visited the Pantex Plant -- where the nation's nuclear stockpile is maintained and weapons are assembled and dismantled.

Why the Nuclear Stockpile Needs Supercomputers

NNSA supercomputers are a key part of our ability to keep our nuclear stockpile safe, secure and effective.

Robot Reworked to Analyze Radiation in Japan
A technician at Idaho National Laboratory demonstrates the modified TALON robot.

TALON robots from the Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory are helping the Government of Japan monitor radioactivity levels at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant.