You are here

Cost-Efficient Work Rids Paducah Site of Old Facilities

April 25, 2012 - 12:00pm

Addthis

Old trailers that had sat for decades in the southwestern part of the Paducah site were cut up and placed in containers so that the debris could be placed in the site’s industrial landfill.

Old trailers that had sat for decades in the southwestern part of the Paducah site were cut up and placed in containers so that the debris could be placed in the site’s industrial landfill.

Workers cut up old trailers and placed them in containers so that the debris could be placed in the site’s industrial landfill.

Workers cut up old trailers and placed them in containers so that the debris could be placed in the site’s industrial landfill.

This railroad scale house, in West Kentucky Wildlife Management Area east of the Paducah site, was used
in the 1950s to weigh Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant freight. Workers preserved the old scale because of its potential historical significance. The scale house was demolished.

This railroad scale house, in West Kentucky Wildlife Management Area east of the Paducah site, was used in the 1950s to weigh Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant freight. Workers preserved the old scale because of its potential historical significance. The scale house was demolished.

Old trailers that had sat for decades in the southwestern part of the Paducah site were cut up and placed in containers so that the debris could be placed in the site’s industrial landfill.
Workers cut up old trailers and placed them in containers so that the debris could be placed in the site’s industrial landfill.
This railroad scale house, in West Kentucky Wildlife Management Area east of the Paducah site, was used
in the 1950s to weigh Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant freight. Workers preserved the old scale because of its potential historical significance. The scale house was demolished.

PADUCAH, Ky. – Workers have been removing old storage trailers and large metal containers from the Paducah site at no extra cost to taxpayers as a result of about $150,000 in labor efficiencies and other savings in the work scope of cleanup contractor LATA Environmental Services of Kentucky.

Workers dismantled, shredded, and packaged five storage trailers before disposing of them in the site’s industrial landfill. They are also removing as many as 85 containers that had been stored outside at the Paducah site for many years. The containers hold personal protective equipment, tools and other items that supported field work. The contents of the containers are no longer needed.

The $50,000 and $100,000 estimated costs of the trailer and container removal, respectively, are being financed through labor efficiencies in LATA Kentucky’s Waste Management Program, which maintains the landfill. Several heavy equipment operators, truck drivers and related personnel are shifted as time permits from other ongoing work to trailer and container removal.

“We’re saving tax dollars and utilizing a select group of workers to their fullest extent without adding personnel,” said Reinhard Knerr, DOE Paducah Site Lead. “Also, removing unneeded containers and facilities improves the appearance of the site.”

The trailers, once used for environmental sampling activities, had sat in the southwestern area of the site for more than two decades. Workers used heavy machinery with a shearer to cut them up. They were included in LATA Kentucky’s contract for demolition and removal as a stretch goal if the work could be done through labor efficiencies.

The containers being removed were identified through a housekeeping and cost-reduction assessment conducted in November, said Mike Zeiss, LATA Kentucky waste disposition manager. The containers and trailers were more than 20 years old. After inspection, they were deemed unusable without significant capital investment.

The trailers and containers are part of more than 142,000 square feet of inactive facilities scheduled to be razed through 2014 as part of the site’s decontamination and decommissioning program.

Another facility on that list of inactive facilities is an old railroad scale house that was removed. About 90 percent of the structure was recycled. An abandoned building in the West Kentucky Wildlife Management Area southeast of the site, the scale house was used in the 1950s to weigh Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant freight.

Workers preserved the old scale inside the scale house for possible historical significance at the request of the Paducah Citizens Advisory Board, said Jim Walk of the LATA Kentucky team’s Environmental Remediation Group. The scale house structure was not identified for potential historic value.

A fence and building debris were staged at the site for recycling. A small amount of material went into the site’s industrial landfill.

Addthis