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Advanced Ground Source Heat Pump Technology for Very-Low-Energy Buildings

Three new/under-utilized ground loop designs being evaluated for their ground loop cost reduction potential<br />
Credit: Oak Ridge National Lab

Three new/under-utilized ground loop designs being evaluated for their ground loop cost reduction potential
Credit: Oak Ridge National Lab

Cumulative GSHP conditioned building floor space in the United States and China<br />
Credit: Oak Ridge National Lab

Cumulative GSHP conditioned building floor space in the United States and China
Credit: Oak Ridge National Lab

Three new/under-utilized ground loop designs being evaluated for their ground loop cost reduction potential<br />
Credit: Oak Ridge National Lab
Cumulative GSHP conditioned building floor space in the United States and China<br />
Credit: Oak Ridge National Lab

Lead Performer: Oak Ridge National Laboratory - Oak Ridge, TN
Partners:
-- ClimateMaster - Oklahoma City, OK
-- Oklahoma State University - Stillwater, OK
-- Oklahoma Gas & Electric - Oklahoma City, OK
-- International Ground Source Heat Pump Association - Stillwater, OK
-- Chinese Academy of Building Research - Beijing, China
-- Tongji University - Shanghai, China
-- Tianjin University - Tianjin, China
-- Chongqing University - Chongqing, China
DOE Funding: $785,000
Cost Share: $800,000
Project Term: Dec. 2010 - Dec. 2015

Project Objective

The U.S.-China Clean Energy Research Center (CERC) is a pioneering research and development (R&D) consortium bringing together governments, key policymakers, researchers, and industry to develop a long-term platform for sustainable U.S.-China joint R&D. This ongoing CERC project accelerates ground source heat pump (GSHP) deployment by developing and identifying new technologies that reduce cost and/or improve performance. A central goal of this project is the exchange of best practices between the two countries, which can lead to improved operational efficiency and lower costs for GSHP systems. In addition to identifying lower-cost and performance-neutral ground heat exchangers, and comparing GSHP applications in the two countries, the project team is developing smart controls for components of GSHP systems, including circulation pumps and the hot water tank tied with GSHP systems for domestic hot water generation. These controls can increase both the space conditioning and water heating efficiency by 10%.

Contacts

DOE Technology Manager: Tony Bouza, Richard Karney
Performer: Xiaobing Liu, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

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