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Six EERE-funded projects recognized with R&D 100 Awards

November 10, 2014 - 4:26pm

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The EERE-funded Solar Thermochemical Advanced Reactor System converts natural gas and sunlight into a more energy-rich fuel called syngas, which power plants can burn to make electricity.

The EERE-funded Solar Thermochemical Advanced Reactor System converts natural gas and sunlight into a more energy-rich fuel called syngas, which power plants can burn to make electricity.

Widely recognized as the “Oscars of Invention,” the 52nd R&D 100 Awards ceremony took place last week. These awards identify and honor major technological breakthroughs each year. The categories cover industry, academia, and government research.

Since their inception in 1963, the awards have identified new technologies with game-changing capabilities, including the fax machine, the anti-smoking patch, the high-definition television, and more.

It’s always an exciting time for the science and tech community when the awards are announced, and this year was no different.

This year, EERE-funded projects won six awards across four of our technology areas: Bioenergy, Fuel Cells/Solar, and Vehicles.

Bioenergy Technologies Office 

  • Super-Hydro-Tunable Membrane: Helps reduce the price of bio-ethanol, ethanol-gasoline blend fuels, and drop-in fuels from bio-oil processing by serving as an energy-efficient alternative to distillation.

Fuel Cells/Solar Technologies Offices

Vehicles Technologies Office

  • Ionic Liquids: Liquids that can be used as friction and wear reduction additives for lubricating oil that could save the United States millions of barrels of oil each year.         
  • Redox Shuttle Additive: Chemical that prevents overcharging by electrochemically “locking in” a maximum voltage that is dependent on the chemical structure of the additive and the nature of the battery material.
  • Radio Frequency Diesel Particulate Filter Sensor: Measures the amount and distribution of soot and ash in the filters that remove particulate matter from the exhaust of diesel engines.
  • Advanced Electrolyte Model: Analyzes and identifies potential electrolytes for use in battery systems.

Learn more about the awards:

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