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UPDATED: Apps for Energy Winners Announced Today!

June 6, 2012 - 2:00pm

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<a href="http://appsforenergy.challenge.gov/submissions/7987-leafully">Leafully</a>, submitted by "two developers with an idea," won the Apps for Energy Best Overall Application grand prize.

Leafully, submitted by "two developers with an idea," won the Apps for Energy Best Overall Application grand prize.

UPDATE: This post now includes the Popular Choice award winners, announced June 6.

Today, the Energy Department announced the winners for the first-ever Apps for Energy competition.



Launched in early April, Apps for Energy challenged software developers to build web and mobile apps that help utility customers understand and visualize their energy usage data in meaningful ways. The competition leverages Green Button -- an open standard for sharing electricity data that is available to millions of consumers and businesses across America. Apps for Energy submissions help consumers utilize Green Button data to save money by saving energy.



The Best Overall and Best Student apps were announced May 22 by Assistant Secretary for the Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability Patricia Hoffman at ConnectivityWeek, a gathering of smart grid industry leaders in Santa Clara, California. A diverse panel drawn from government and the energy and tech communities evaluated the apps.



The winners will be invited to demonstrate their apps at an energy data event in Washington, D.C. later this summer.

Winners for the “Apps for Energy” competition are:



Best Overall App Grand Prize: Leafully


Location: Seattle, Washington



This app is the brainchild of Seattle-based team, Timothy Edgar and Nathan Jhaveri who describe themselves as “two developers with an idea.” Their app submission, Leafully, helps utility customers visualize their Green Button data as a variety of units, such as the amount of trees needed to offset an individual’s energy usage. Leafully encourages users to set energy savings goals and to share their progress on Facebook.



Best Overall App Second Prize
: Melon

Location: Washington, DC



DC-based startup Melon describes itself as the first company to utilize Green Button data to simplify the process of obtaining an ENERGY STAR benchmark for commercial buildings. The app uses Green Button to evaluate the energy performance of commercial buildings.



Best Overall App Third Prize
:  VELObill


Location: New York, NY



Cleantech software and services company Zerofootprint’s VELObill app helps makes it easier for utility customers to view their energy usage, measure whether it is high or low, and compare it to that of their peers. With this information in hand, users can create an energy saving action plan tailored to their individual needs and preferences.



Best Student App Grand Prize: wotz


Location: Irvine, CA



The wotz app, submitted by a team of students at the University of California, Irvine, lets users explore and play with Green Button data. The app provides several games based on the "shape" of your data, and provides creative comparisons to illustrate your usage, like how many cheeseburgers worth of energy you used last Tuesday from 5 to 6 pmm.



Best Student App Second Prize: Budget It Yourself  


Location: Cleveland, OH



The Budget it Yourself app is a collaborative project from a team of students at Case Western Reserve University and the Cleveland Institute of Art. The app helps users track their energy usage and make energy-savings goals.

Popular Choice Award Grand Prize: VELObill 


Location: New York, NY



Cleantech software and services company Zerofootprint’s VELObill app helps makes it easier for utility customers to view their energy usage, measure whether it is high or low, and compare it to that of their peers. With this information in hand, users can create an energy saving action plan tailored to their individual needs and preferences.





Popular Choice Award Second Prize: Innovative Solar Demand Response  


Location: Cleveland, OH



This app uses Green Button Data to size a Solar PV and a battery system based on average peak energy demand of a home during different hours of the day. The battery is charged by solar PV during daytime (when solar radiation is available) and a charge/discharge controller would release the stored energy during peak times, when energy production is more costly.

 

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