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Photo of the Week: A Storm in Albuquerque, New Mexico

July 31, 2013 - 10:32am

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Did you know: a typical bolt of lightning is about 3 miles long and heats the air immediately surrounding the bolt to over 20,000 degrees Celsius? That's three times hotter than the surface of the sun. For many Americans, summer isn't complete without an exciting thunderstorm to break up the heat. This electrifying photo was taken by Sandia Labs photographer Randy Montoya during a summer storm on July 21, 2013. The lightning illuminated the Redstone rocket that stands in front of the National Museum of Nuclear Science & History in Albuquerque, New Mexico. | Photo courtesy of Randy Montoya, Sandia National Laboratory.

Did you know: a typical bolt of lightning is about 3 miles long and heats the air immediately surrounding the bolt to over 20,000 degrees Celsius? That's three times hotter than the surface of the sun. For many Americans, summer isn't complete without an exciting thunderstorm to break up the heat. This electrifying photo was taken by Sandia Labs photographer Randy Montoya during a summer storm on July 21, 2013. The lightning illuminated the Redstone rocket that stands in front of the National Museum of Nuclear Science & History in Albuquerque, New Mexico. | Photo courtesy of Randy Montoya, Sandia National Laboratory.

Every week, we'll feature our favorite energy-related photo here on Energy.gov, at Facebook.com/Energygov, on Twitter via @ENERGY and on our Flickr photostream. For other photos of the week, view our gallery. If you have ideas for Photo of the Week, send us an email at NewMedia@hq.doe.gov.

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