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Photo of the Week: Oak Ridge in 1945

October 23, 2013 - 4:12pm

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James Edward Westcott was one of the only people permitted to have a camera at the Oak Ridge site during the Manhattan Project and the Cold War. He documented the lives of many of the residents and workers in the “Atomic City,” in the days before Oak Ridge National Laboratory was actually Oak Ridge National Lab.
 
In this February 1945 photo, a young woman is welding in the prefabrication shop building, part of the K-25 uranium separation facilities, one of three Manhattan Project sites in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Many of the men and women who worked on these projects still live in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, today. | Photo by James Edward Westcott, courtesy of DOE & the National Archives.

James Edward Westcott was one of the only people permitted to have a camera at the Oak Ridge site during the Manhattan Project and the Cold War. He documented the lives of many of the residents and workers in the “Atomic City,” in the days before Oak Ridge National Laboratory was actually Oak Ridge National Lab. In this February 1945 photo, a young woman is welding in the prefabrication shop building, part of the K-25 uranium separation facilities, one of three Manhattan Project sites in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Many of the men and women who worked on these projects still live in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, today. | Photo by James Edward Westcott, courtesy of DOE & the National Archives.

Every week, we'll feature our favorite energy-related photo here on Energy.gov, at Facebook.com/Energygov, on Twitter via @ENERGY and on our Flickr photostream. For other photos of the week, view our gallery. If you have ideas for Photo of the Week, send us an email at NewMedia@hq.doe.gov.

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