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Photo of the Week: Inside the Super HILAC

August 29, 2013 - 2:55pm

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Super HILAC (Super Heavy Ion Linear Accelerator) was one of the first particle accelerators that could accelerate heavier elements to “atom-smashing” speeds. The device was built in 1972 and played a significant role in four decades of scientific research at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. In addition to being the launchpad for a variety of major experiments, the Super HILAC was crucial in the discovery of five superheavy elements.
 
In this photo, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory’s Bob Stevenson and Frank Grobelch are sitting inside the Super HILAC’s poststripper. The maze of piping behind them is meant to circulate cooling water through the accelerator. | Photo courtesy of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

Super HILAC (Super Heavy Ion Linear Accelerator) was one of the first particle accelerators that could accelerate heavier elements to “atom-smashing” speeds. The device was built in 1972 and played a significant role in four decades of scientific research at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. In addition to being the launchpad for a variety of major experiments, the Super HILAC was crucial in the discovery of five superheavy elements. In this photo, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory’s Bob Stevenson and Frank Grobelch are sitting inside the Super HILAC’s poststripper. The maze of piping behind them is meant to circulate cooling water through the accelerator. | Photo courtesy of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

Every week, we'll feature our favorite energy-related photo here on Energy.gov, at Facebook.com/Energygov, on Twitter via @ENERGY and on our Flickr photostream. For other photos of the week, view our gallery. If you have ideas for Photo of the Week, send us an email at NewMedia@hq.doe.gov.

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