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Photo of the Week: The Alternating Gradient Synchrotron

March 11, 2013 - 6:00pm

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Since 1960, the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) has been one of the world's premiere particle accelerators, well known for the <a href="http://www.bnl.gov/bnlweb/history/nobel/" target="_blank">three Nobel Prizes</a> won as a result of research performed there. The AGS name is derived from the concept of alternating gradient focusing, in which the field gradients of the accelerator's 240 magnets are successively alternated inward and outward, permitting particles to be propelled and focused in both the horizontal and vertical plane at the same time. In this 1958 photo, giant magnets await installation into the AGS accelerator ring tunnel at Brookhaven National Laboratory. | Photo courtesy of Brookhaven National Laboratory.

Since 1960, the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) has been one of the world's premiere particle accelerators, well known for the three Nobel Prizes won as a result of research performed there. The AGS name is derived from the concept of alternating gradient focusing, in which the field gradients of the accelerator's 240 magnets are successively alternated inward and outward, permitting particles to be propelled and focused in both the horizontal and vertical plane at the same time. In this 1958 photo, giant magnets await installation into the AGS accelerator ring tunnel at Brookhaven National Laboratory. | Photo courtesy of Brookhaven National Laboratory.

Every week, we'll feature our favorite energy-related photo here on Energy.gov, at Facebook.com/Energygov, on Twitter via @ENERGY and on our Flickr photostream. For other photos of the week, view our gallery. If you have ideas for Photo of the Week, send us an email at NewMedia@hq.doe.gov.

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