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Photo of the Week: Acoustic Levitation for Medicine

October 19, 2012 - 2:08pm

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This acoustic levitator was originally developed to help NASA simulate microgravity conditions, but now, scientists are using this piece of equipment to study pharmaceutical solutions at the molecular level. At Argonne National Laboratory, droplets are suspended in air between two sets of speakers, which generate sound waves at frequencies slightly above the audible range -- about 22 kilohertz. Learn more about how acoustic levitation is performed and how it helps scientists study pharmaceuticals <a href="http://www.anl.gov/articles/no-magic-show-real-world-levitation-inspire-better-pharmaceuticals" target="_blank">here</a>. | Photo by Dan Harris, Argonne National Laboratory.

This acoustic levitator was originally developed to help NASA simulate microgravity conditions, but now, scientists are using this piece of equipment to study pharmaceutical solutions at the molecular level. At Argonne National Laboratory, droplets are suspended in air between two sets of speakers, which generate sound waves at frequencies slightly above the audible range -- about 22 kilohertz. Learn more about how acoustic levitation is performed and how it helps scientists study pharmaceuticals here. | Photo by Dan Harris, Argonne National Laboratory.

Every week, we'll feature our favorite energy-related photo here on Energy.gov, at Facebook.com/Energygov, on Twitter via @ENERGY and on our Flickr photostream. For other photos of the week, view our gallery. If you have ideas for Photo of the Week, send us an email at NewMedia@hq.doe.gov.

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