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Diversity -- Recruiting the Best and the Brightest

February 27, 2012 - 10:43am

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Associate Deputy Secretary Williams at the Black Engineer of the Year Conference, joined by Dean Deloach of Morgan State University, Malika Hobbs with the National Nuclear Security Administration and Annie Whatley of the Office of Economic Impact and Diversity. | Office of Economic Impact and Diversity file photo.

Associate Deputy Secretary Williams at the Black Engineer of the Year Conference, joined by Dean Deloach of Morgan State University, Malika Hobbs with the National Nuclear Security Administration and Annie Whatley of the Office of Economic Impact and Diversity. | Office of Economic Impact and Diversity file photo.

To achieve the mission of the Energy Department, we must have the best and the brightest working with us. Embracing diversity and engaging all of America in our work is about more than numbers and statistics -- it’s a cross-cutting imperative for the people, programs, and partners at the Department.

Earlier this month, Associate Deputy Secretary Mel Williams visited the Black Engineer of the Year STEM conference, one of the many national groups that is actively working to advance diversity in the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields. At the conference, Associate Deputy Secretary Williams met with thousands of professionals and students from STEM disciplines and careers.

The expertise at the conference was as diverse as the men and women who attended. During workshops on professional development, networking, mentoring, and career advancement, Associate Deputy Secretary Williams and staff from the National Nuclear Security Administration and the Office of Economic Impact and Diversity met with STEM innovators and leaders from minority educational institutions.

The Energy Department has a long history of working closely with minority educational institutions, establishing business relationships with these institutions through research opportunities, grants, and cooperative agreements. The successes of these partnerships are measured by the increased capability of minority educational institutions to compete effectively for Energy Department grants and contracts.

At the conference, a group of engineering deans of historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) recognized the Energy Department as one of  the Top 25 companies and government agencies supporting HBCUs, ranking the Department sixth on the list.

Participating in events like the Black Engineers of the Year Conference is just one of many ways that the Energy Department engages with minority educational institutions, minority students in STEM, and historically-underrepresented communities. Last year, Secretary Chu highlighted the Department’s support of STEM education and HBCUs when he visited the campus of Morgan State University.

Learn more about our work to increase diversity in STEM fields here, and check out other upcoming diversity events on our calendar.

 

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